BiblioCommons Commitment to Accessibility

Last updated: Dec 12, 2017

Public Libraries have long served their communities as welcoming, open, and inclusive built environments. As a digital service provider to Public Libraries, we know that the online experience we create needs to be welcoming and inclusive to people with a wide range of abilities. This includes those who rely on assistive technology to access online services, in addition to individuals with cognitive and digital-literacy challenges.

An important part of our commitment to those using assistive technology includes the implementation of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 level AA, which we’ll just call the “Guidelines” for the rest of this document. Beyond these Guidelines, we have also set the goal of meeting the more broadly defined usability needs of users of assistive technology.

How Are We Doing This

The WCAG Guidelines serve as an internationally accepted measure of success for websites and online applications, and so we are using them to evaluate our current services and make changes and adjustments to better serve people with disabilities. We are committed to providing online services that not only meet but exceed the criteria set out by the Guidelines.

As part of our design and development process, we have worked with third-party experts to review our websites, identify accessibility goals based on the Guidelines and have created a plan to meet these goals as we update and improve our websites overall. Our team has been trained in how to implement the Guidelines in the design, development and testing of the websites and has made a number of significant changes to the services over the last year, and is working steadily to align all of the services with the Guidelines, and the regulations that use the Guidelines as their measure.

Steps We've Taken So Far

  • We commissioned a professional audit of our websites and received recommendations that will bring the websites in line with the Guidelines.
  • We have worked and will continue to work with our library partners to identify specific issues members of their communities are experiencing and address those issues.
  • Some of these improvements have already been completed. In each case, we have aimed for solutions that align both with the Guidelines and with more broadly-defined principles of usability. These improvements include:
    • Text Equivalents — We are working to ensure that images are accessible to people who use screen readers and other assistive technology by using appropriate alternative text.
    • Site Structure — We are working to ensure that appropriate headings are used so that people can use the site with assistive technology.
    • Keyboard Access — Improving keyboard access for non-mouse input devices, including ongoing projects:
      • to open modals, overlays or dialogs with the correct focus
      • to make it easier to navigate headings, lists, paragraphs, links and buttons
      • to ensure that forms are fully accessible.
    • Magnification — We are working to ensure that the main workflows in our sites can be used by people with screen magnifiers.
    • Color Contrast — Ensuring that color use on the websites does not compromise text legibility.
  • We have also implemented design and review procedures that will align future features and development with the Guidelines.

How We Make It Sustainable

We have taken a few steps to ensure that accessibility is not a one-time project, but becomes an ongoing process of improvement.

  • Our product team includes accessibility and usability criteria for any new feature or improvements to existing features.
  • The User Experience (UX) team approaches new designs and improvements through the lens of the Guidelines and usability practices.
  • As our development teams write new code for those designs, they are refining consistent practices for accessibility according to the Guidelines and usability insights, and applying those systematically to the application.
  • Our Quality Assurance team now tests each new feature using a variety of assistive technology such as screen readers and high contrast displays.
  • We have put in place automated tests to ensure that new changes do not violate the basic structures recommended in the Guidelines.

In addition, our teams have developed internal standards and processes to ensure that both new and current employees have the knowledge and tools they need to make the right choices for accessibility and usability throughout the product development process.

Are We There Yet?

We have covered a lot of ground, but we know we have more work to do. Over the course of 2018, we have queued a number of remaining workflows for improvement, and will continue to scrutinize and improve our services thereafter. We appreciate your patience as we continue to take steps to make our services accessible and usable for all.

About Third Party Content and Features

Our online products may include content and utilities from third party sites and products. We cannot control or correct any issues with this content or its accessibility, but it’s important for us to be able to pass on any accessibility issues to the creators of those sites.

Is This the Only Accessibility Statement That Exists For My Library?

Here is a link to your library’s own accessibility statement.

Feedback or Questions?

If you experience an accessibility issue with BiblioCommons websites or you have any questions or accessibility concerns, please contact your library.

Contact Phone (913) 826-4600
Contact Email ask@jocolibrary.libanswers.com
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