A time for drunken horses

A time for drunken horses

DVD - 2011 | Persian
Average Rating:
5
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After their father dies, a family of five is forced to survive on their own in a Kurdish village on the border of Iran and Iraq. Matters are made worse when twelve-year-old Ayoub, the new head of the family, is told that his handicapped brother Madi needs an immediate operation in order to remain alive. The family must go to any length to survive in the harshest of conditions, where even the horses are fed liquor to get them to work.
Publisher: New York, NY : Lorber Films, [2011]
Branch Call Number: DVD Time
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (75 min.) :,sd., col. ;,4 3/4 in.

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l
LindNor11
Sep 04, 2017

A beautiful but sad movie about orphan siblings living in desperate conditions and their love for each other. The second son attempts to earn money to support the family and pay for an operation to save the eldest brother. Exceedingly talented non-professional actors.

b
B_Jane_Thomson
Nov 10, 2014

This movie was painful to watch at times. Life's unfair treatment of those who are already struggling causes you to feel outrage.. The children were all wonderful in their portrayal of life as it really is. Even several weeks later your heart aches with the memory of this story and the hope that the children engender.

manoush Oct 26, 2014

Not for the faint of heart. This is an achingly beautiful, sobering, humbling film about the struggle for survival of an orphaned family of 5 Kurdish siblings living on the Iran side of the Iran-Iraq border. Even before the first shot, the film immediately places you in the siblings' unforgiving world with the voice-over narration of the precocious Ameneh, a luminous child actress. You hardly have a chance to orient yourself before a heartbreaking event upturns the children's lives and forces oldest brother Ayoub (Job) to be the breadwinner, smuggling goods back and forth across the dangerous, mine-filled border between Iran and Iraq. The incredibly tender interactions between the siblings are beyond moving and ought to count as some of the most delicate human emotions ever captured on film. Bahman Ghobadi is a master at transporting you out of your own cramped, self-involved life to witness the harrowing lives of others. For good reason, he's become the singular chronicler of the Kurdish plight, employing the language of film in breathtaking ways to bear witness and pay homage to the decades-long suffering of the Kurdish people. Almost every frame in this film is a thing of beauty, be it the stooped men and mules smuggling goods across the windswept, mist-shrouded border or close-ups of the searching, innocent, wide eyes of Ameneh and her siblings. A humane, humbling film.

r
Ron@Ottawa
Nov 12, 2012

This is a depressing human drama, played ably by a cast of child actors, about children living near the Iran/Iraq border and their story of daily survival. They had to fight poverty, landmines, a harsh winter and other negative elements. However, the bonding and love among the brothers and sisters remain strong and I find this bonding to be very inspiring. The scenery of an exotic location is a bonus.

m
MJN
Jun 01, 2011

Beautiful scenes and play by kids.
make you sad for the poverty side of the story while you will love it for children's hope and love and simplicity

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