Jamaica Inn

Jamaica Inn

Book - 2015
Average Rating:
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The coachman tried to warn young Mary Yellan away from the ruined, forbidding place on the rainswept Cornish coast. But May chose instead to honor her mother's dying request that she join her frightened Aunt Patience and foreboding Uncle Joss Merlyn at Jamaica Inn. From her first glimpse on that raw November eve, she could sense the inn's dark power. Mary never imagined that she would become hopelessly ensnared in the vile, villainous schemes being hatched within its crumbling walls or that she would fall in love with a handsome, enigmatic stranger. But what secrets is he hiding from her and can she really trust him?
Publisher: New York, N.Y. :, William Morrow,, 2015.
Edition: First William Morrow printing.
Copyright Date: ©1936
ISBN: 9780062404893
006240489X
Branch Call Number: FICTION DuMaurie Daphne 01/1936
Characteristics: 347 pages ;,20 cm

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Janice21383
Aug 05, 2017

Jamaica Inn has a promising beginning (orphan girl, isolated inn, sinister "uncle") and an ambitious ending, but very little middle. Mary Yellan, who is portrayed as an intelligent, active young woman, hangs around doing almost nothing until it is time for the shipwreck. Worth reading, but an author of du Maurier's stature should not leave you thinking "is that all there is?"

y
yoj
Apr 07, 2017

This is not Daphne du Maurier's novel. It is a play by Lisa Evans. The Summary details and reviews here are misleading as they all refer to the novel which this is not .

athompson10 Dec 16, 2015

An old-style romance, with some beautiful descriptions of the wild and rugged English moors.

j
johndouglashey
Jan 26, 2015

The strength of the novel lies in its close association with the rugged landscape and coastline of Cornwall, and particularly the detailed descriptions of Bodmin Moor, on which the author apparently spent a great deal of time examining the hills and marshes. In this respect, comparison with the fine Wessex novels of Thomas Hardy, based in Dorset, is interesting. This novel is marred, however, by a striking discrepancy between the vocabulary and manner of speech of the characters, and the supposed period of events (Regency period, ca. 1810): the characters belong instead to period of Daphne du Maurier, ca. 1930. The reader will note certain words, e.g 'trek' [Cape Dutch, which entered the English language only after the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1901)], which no-one of the Jane Austin period would have understood. It is surprising that she, unlike her contemporary Georgette Heyer, who prepared her novels in this respect with meticulous care, made so little effort to adapt her writing to the historical period. The novel is, certainly, far stronger in terms of human emotion and adventure, than anything which Georgette Heyer wrote, but nowhere does "Jamaica Inn" come close to the subtlety and descriptive power of Thomas Hardy.
Those who associate the title with the fine film of Alfred Hitchcock (starring Charles Laughton) will be surprised to note how widely the film and the book differ. In my opinion, Hitchcock has done well to replace the implausible Vicar of Altarnun with Sir Humphrey Pengallan, a very clever notion which works well on screen.

l
llongpine
Jul 28, 2014

I was somewhat disappointed in this book. It was ok but not nearly as good as Rebecca or Frenchman's Creek. The story was kind of slow and the ending was a let down.

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