Pachinko

Pachinko

eBook - 2017
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Publisher: Grand Central Pub.,, 2017.
ISBN: 9781455569656
1455569658
Branch Call Number: eBook
Characteristics: 1 online resource
text file, rda

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JCLSamS Jul 06, 2020

As the description states, Pachinko a multi-generational saga following a family (and various side characters) through their lives as Korean immigrants to Japan, beginning in the early parts of the 20th century. For such a lengthy book, I was always driven to find out what would happen next and f... Read More »

Corinth Library discussing this book on on April 28, 2020.

Corinth Library discussing this book on on April 28, 2020.

Corinth Library discussing this book on on April 28, 2020.

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Eil_1
Jan 09, 2021

An enthralling and informative novel that follows three generations of Koreans caught up in the colonization of Korea by Japan. The indiscriminate prejudice and abuse by the Japanese is another shameful example of Japan - in China, Korea and, not the least, of becoming an ally of Germany and their attack on Hawaii.
Events lead the young pregnant matriarch, Sunja, to leave Korea, wed a minister, and move to Japan. Hardships continue for many years - illnesses, death and a continuing struggle to rise out of extreme poverty.
Ultimately, through the ownership of Pachinko parlors, the family rises to wealth. Nevertheless, wealth is not what cements this family together; rather, it is loyalty, mutual commitment and love that is their secret weapon.
Highly worth reading.

h
hannah8177
Jan 03, 2021

If you don't like long reviews, just read the last segment. But if you enjoy wasting time like I did writing this, just keep reading:

You don't need to be a koreaboo and/or a weeb to gain interest in this story; it's a fictitious, representative novel of thousands of stories told by Korean-Japanese immigrants and their descendants (best of both worlds? possibly). In this novel, Min Jin Lee writes the tale of several generations through one Korean family line over various life circumstances, allowing readers to sympathize and follow with every character's storylines. She is amazing at writing overlapping character development as she intertwines complex issues into the story. The plot is devoted to a genuine issue among Korean-Japanese immigrants and descendants who suffer from discrimination of being a "zainichi", a Japanese slang term referring to "foreign resident staying in Japan". The novel took about a week to read and I was amazed at the author's expertise the entire time. Though this story stood with Lee for nearly 30 years, it was definitely time well spent writing.

TL;DR:
-book = good.
-compatible for (non-) koreaboos and weebs /s
-centralized around discrimination among Korean-Japanese citizens
-there is some gambling. some drinking. lots of sex. just the good stuff.

l
l_langer
Nov 30, 2020

I really enjoyed learning more about Korean culture and especially the history of Koreans living in Japan. The author writes in a way that really lends you to feeling like you get to know the characters. My favourite character was Mozasu. I liked how he was kind of the opposite inside of his overly rough and tough physical outside. He also had the ability to see beyond what sometimes are one's first perceptions of people, for example his friendship with Etsuko or Haruki, and see them for who they were on the inside.

d
Debramsey
Oct 15, 2020

Interesting to learn of Korean culture - and what pachinko is!

b
BookLover4fun
Oct 08, 2020

Well written historical fiction about a Korean family, set mostly in Japan, from 1910-1989. Racial prejudice against Koreans raged. The family patriarch is Hansa, a yakuza or mafia businessman who meets a young Korean girl, Sunji, and she becomes pregnant outside of marriage. She emigrates to Japan to marry Isak, a kind but sickly Christian Korean minister, who agrees to be the child Noa’s father. The story takes many twists and turns through wars, births and deaths, and much hardship. Great wealth is ultimately achieved through the Korean game of pachinko, but at a tragically high cost.

c
clairemars
Aug 14, 2020

I read this book over a year ago and still think about it. It's an amazing story, very well-written and the story sticks with you. I would recommend this to anyone looking to read a well-rounded, generally overall "good" story. I just put another book by the same author on hold, because I was wishing I could reread Pachinko again with fresh eyes and experience that same immense enjoyment that I felt the first time reading it.

a
andreabilyeu
Aug 11, 2020

I didn't realize how Koreans were discriminated against in Japan. Very good read.

JCLSamS Jul 06, 2020

As the description states, Pachinko a multi-generational saga following a family (and various side characters) through their lives as Korean immigrants to Japan, beginning in the early parts of the 20th century. For such a lengthy book, I was always driven to find out what would happen next and felt truly invested in the daily tragedies and joys of the family. As compelling as it was, it was also educational. The author clearly did her research on this particular period in history and the experience of Korean people living in Japan. I finished the book feeling that I'd learned a great deal on topics I'd hardly heard of before. While I think it was worth the read, I did feel that the third act fell short of the first two and there were times when the writing seemed rushed. Others disagree, so it may depend on which characters you feel most attached to.

p
pozrob
Mar 05, 2020

The inside jacket gives an accurate description of what the book is about so I won’t rehash it. When I put this book down for the day I can’t say that I couldn’t wait to pick it up again. Slow moving, way too long and drawn out. Good historical insight however into what life was like for ordinary Koreans under Imperial Japanese colonial control. Interesting perspective of Korean’s view of Americans during our (sadly) forgotten war on a peninsula that is still a danger to the region’s stability to this day.

wendybird Mar 04, 2020

This is one of the finest novels I have read in ages. Part family saga, part historical fiction, and certainly part magic, writer Min Jin Lee worked with the text for 30 years, and has crafted it finely. The tale itself begins in 1900, with Sunja, a young woman & fisherman's daughter, as she falls in love at the Korean seaside. It sweeps through 4 generations of Koreans living in Japan, taking the reader from the bustling street markets, all the way to the glistening new towers of Osaka and Tokyo.
The story is compelling - one of those books that has you making excuses so you could go back to reading it.

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carolinemichelle
Feb 19, 2020

carolinemichelle thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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Tjad2LT
Aug 23, 2017

Sexual Content: explicit sexual content

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ambdizzle
Aug 23, 2019

Yoseb could understand the boy’s anger, but he wanted another chance to talk to him, to tell Noa that a man must learn to forgive—to know what is important, that to live without forgiveness was a kind of death with breathing and movement.

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