Look Me in the Eye

Look Me in the Eye

My Life With Asperger's

Book - 2007
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John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits had earned him the label "social deviant." No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings drunk. No wonder he gravitated to machines, which could be counted on. His savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars. Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate. It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself--and the world.--From publisher description.
Publisher: New York : Crown Publishers, c2007.
Edition: 1st ed.
ISBN: 9780307395986
0307395987
9780307396181
Branch Call Number: BIO Robison J.
Characteristics: xiv, 288 p. ;,25 cm.

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JCLLaurelA Jan 23, 2021

I give this a rare 5 stars. I loved this book! John Elder Robison gives us a great insider's view into the world of Asperger's. His ability to play pranks and tell big whopping lies (his "sanitation engineer" stories had me legitimately laughing out loud on my lunch break!) with his dia... Read More »


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JCLLaurelA Jan 23, 2021

I give this a rare 5 stars. I loved this book! John Elder Robison gives us a great insider's view into the world of Asperger's. His ability to play pranks and tell big whopping lies (his "sanitation engineer" stories had me legitimately laughing out loud on my lunch break!) with his diagnosis is amazing. Many of the students and adults I have worked with do not have that innate ability of lying or bending the truth. They can't say "It was nice to see you," at the end of a conversation if they did not legitimately enjoy seeing that person, because it is illogical. John talks about that more towards the end of the book, how he has to work to remember that someone's child is in college and that asking how they are doing is a good social maneuver. The ability to have "small talk" is not something many ASD people are born with.
The story of John Elder trying to make friends with Chuckie in the beginning of the book is such a wonderful example of Asperger's. He knows how to make friends with Poodle, so why would it be a different method for a human? Robison's ability to observe the social skills of others and to learn on his own is remarkable. Many students I've worked with in the past just don't have that ability, and I'm so glad John Elder was able to build himself a good set of life skills and make a good life for himself.

Gina_Vee Jul 30, 2018

Still the best source (and best author) for Asperger's I've found. If you've ever been around someone with Asperger's and spent time getting to know them better, you'll understand exactly why the book was written the way it is.

l
lilamolly
Sep 15, 2017

Unfortunately this book makes Aspergers syndrome look like a walk in the park. The author wasted a lot of space talking about his electronic and musical accomplishments which are fine and many with this syndrome have. The real problems people with this affliction face is much greater and in most cases much more severe than this author has experienced. His parents genetic and emotional problems are probably more of a cause for his behaviour than Aspergers syndrome. Having Aspergers can be a very frustrating and lonely affliction and can give people the mistaken opinion that all that it is, is not knowing social clues. IT is much more debilitating and emotionally disruptive in a persons life.

scl_Cori Aug 21, 2017

John Elder is not as good of a writer as his brother Augusten Burroughs, but the book gives us a look into the views of a man growing up with Asperger's Syndrome before such a thing had a name.

w
wcls4667866
Feb 19, 2017

An entertaining read. Very insightful. Helps you understand the life of a person with aspergers from the inside out. Recommended read.

s
Squid_1
Jul 07, 2016

I liked reading it. The last few chapters bored me though.

b
billcelery
Apr 14, 2016

Any book that can take you inside the mind of someone with Asperger's, when you have a family member with it, is valuable in my opinion. An enjoyable read.

b
beemac1997
Oct 19, 2015

A good story of one man's struggle with "being different" and with no support, but surviving and thriving in the end. A good look into perceptions of a person with Asperger's

h
howgwyn
Feb 13, 2013

I enjoyed the first part of the book where Robison describes growing up with autism from his point of view and reflects on how that view point is different from people not on the austism spectrum. Yet I felt the latter part of the book felt rushed and repetative.

r
results
Jul 16, 2012

This book truly helped me understand and sympathize with what's it's like to be Aspergian.

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kayjuni
Jun 13, 2012

"Asperger's is not a disease. It's a way of being. There is no cure, nor is there a need for one."

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